St David's Day Run Ras Dydd Gwyl Dewi

£10,000 raised so far Donate Here
1KM

The 1KM Run

A great race for all the family, whether you want to try running for the first time or all the family want a fun, energetic day out. Enter here and watch mascots and people of all ages have fun together! (This course is suitable for all ages and abilities)

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5KM

The 5KM Run

This race is great for those taking their first steps into racing or for those who are looking for a way to keep up the good work they have already achieved. Whether you are running for personal achievement or to raise money for a good cause, you can enter here!

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10KM

The 10KM Run

>Run in the 10k and challenge yourself, achieving a goal and maybe raising money for a good cause. If you want to take the next step towards a bigger race. Then sign up for the 10k and realise your running potential.

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About the Run

The St David's Day Run was first organised in 2003 by Mr Huw Lewis MBE. The event highlights and celebrates the Welsh National Holiday that is St David's Day and raises vital funds for charities. Over the years the event has gone from strength to strength and raised thousands. It has become part of the calendar of events for The Motivation and Learning Trust the young person's charity. As the run takes place on the weekend closest to St David's Day it always attracts some fantastic costumes and takes in some spectacular views of the capital whilst running around Bute Park. The St David's Day Run has always been a family day out offering a 1K, 5K and 10K race.

Run for the Motivation & Learning Trust

THE ROUTES

TRAINING & FAQ

Training Tips

There’s nothing like racing a fast 5K or 10K– they’re rewarding distances to race and they give you a great runner’s high. But to race fast, you’ve got to run fast in training, so runners seeking to maximise their 5K or 10K potential need to do some interval training.

Running at or faster than your goal race pace will make it feel easier over time and breaking it down into shorter chunks makes it feel more manageable. The sessions collected here are designed to help you improve specific aspects of 5K and 10K fitness – improving speed and turnover, honing pace sense and discipline, boosting mental toughness and confidence, and helping you to develop a finishing kick.

Even those who are not preparing for a race can benefit from these workouts. As well as increasing anaerobic-threshold levels, interval training increases endurance and builds muscle strength. Typical steady-state distance running exercises the leg muscles in a certain range of motion, with the focus on slow-twitch fibres. By running at faster speeds, you exercise all your leg muscles and improve your flexibility during running.

After one or two months of steady distance running, do interval training once a week to reach optimal racing fitness, in addition to a weekly tempo and long run. Bookend these workouts with easy runs or cross-training on the days either side to help recovery and avoid overtaxing your body.

A running track is an ideal place to do them, as the surface is good and measuring the reps is easy. But if you don’t have one near you, any stretch of flat, traffic-free ground (measured using your GPS device or online mapping) will work just fine.

1/ 1.5M progressor

Why: In this 10K-specific session, you hold back for the first repeat and then progressively get faster, which helps you learn to fight the tendency to go out too hard.

How: After a 10-min jog and 4 x 50m accelerations, run three 1.5-mile repeats. Run the first repeat slightly slower than 10K goal pace, the second at goal pace and the third slightly faster than goal pace. Recover between each with a three-min slow jog. Cool down for 10 minutes.

2/ 5K fitness boost

Why: This is a hard session, but it acclimatises the body to running at 5K pace.

How: Warm up for 10 minutes. Do 4 x 700m, with a two-minute recovery jog between each. Start off at 5K pace, but go faster for the last 300m of each rep, and do each 700m rep slightly faster than the last. Recover with a slow five-minute jog. Then do 3 x 200m all out, with one-minute recoveries. Finally, cool down for 10 minutes.

3/ Alternators

Why: A hard workout that will let you know you are race-ready. Upping the pace forces you to run faster on tiring legs – good race-day practice.

How: Run 800m hard, jog 200m, run 300m hard, jog 300m; repeat four to six times. Start the 800s at 10K goal pace and the 300s at 5K goal pace, and get slightly faster with each effort. This workout can be done throughout training: hit the maximum number of reps a month before your event.

4/ Cut-down laps

Why: Helps you practise your 5K and 10K race pace, three laps at a time. The goal is to rehearse different race paces and to finish feeling spent.

How: After a 15-min warm-up that ends in four 15-second accelerations, do 3 x 400m at 10K pace, with 200m recovery jogs; 3 x 400m at 5K pace, with the same recovery intervals; then 3 x 400m at your one-mile pace, with the same recoveries. Jog for 400m between sets. Warm down for 10-15 mins.

5/ Flying 500s

Why: Instils 10K race pace. ‘This is a great workout for targeting an upcoming 10K or building strength for a 5K,’ says Chris Derrick, winner of the Great Edinburgh International Cross Country in 2014 and 2015.

How: After a 10-15-minute warm-up, run 10 x 500m, with two-minute recoveries. Begin at slightly slower than your 10K race pace; gradually speed up so that your last repeat is slightly faster than your 10K race pace.

6/ Gear changer

Why: Teaches you to accelerate when you’re tired, thus developing your ability to deliver a sustained kick. Do one of these four and two weeks out from a goal race.

How: Run 4 x 800m, with three to four minutes of rest between the efforts. Start each repeat at 5K pace in the first one, accelerate after 700m and go all out to the finish. In the second effort, accelerate after 600m; in the third, after 500m; in the final repeat, go as hard as you can after 400m.

7/ 600 solution

Why: Build speed for 5K and 10K. ‘Lots of runners do 400m repeats, but psychologically it helps to do another 200m,’ says Janet Cherobon-Bawcom, who represented the US in the 10,000m at the 2012 Olympics.

How: Warm up for 15 minutes, including four or five 50m accelerations. If you’re targeting a 5K, run six 600m repeats at under 5K goal pace. If you’re aiming for a 10K, run eight to 10 repeats at 5K goal pace. Jog for two mins to recover between efforts.

8/ 5K sharpener

Why: The longer reps get you used to the demands of race pace; the fast, short reps will improve your leg turnover when you’re tired.

How: Run 1,600m, 1,200m, 1,000m and 800m repeats, with 3:30 recoveries between them, and five mins recovery at the end of the set. Then run 2 x 300m and 2 x 200m, with 1:30 recoveries between them. Begin both sets a few secs per mile slower than race pace, but gradually speed up as the reps get shorter until you’re at, or above, race pace.

9/ 5K/10K tune-up

Why: Mixing speed and tempo running prepares you for a fast 5K or 10K. Do this four weeks before your race.

How: After a warm-up, do 3 x 800m, with two-min recoveries between them and three mins’ recovery at the end of the set. Then do 3 x 400m, with 90-sec recoveries between them and five mins’ recovery at the end of the set. Do both sets at goal 5K pace or quicker. Then do 10 mins at tempo pace. Rest for five mins, then do 4 x 200m fast (not all out), with 60-sec recoveries.

10/ 10K simulation

Why: Helps develop a strong finish. ‘I call it a simulation: it mirrors the 10K, while emphasising running hard when you’re tired,’ says Linda Somers Smith, a former Chicago Marathon champion.

How: Warm up for 10 minutes, including four or five 50m accelerations. Then run 2 x 800m at 5K pace, jogging for 400m to recover after each. Follow that with a four-mile run at a pace slightly slower than your half-marathon pace. Then finish with 2 x 800m at 5K pace. Cool down.

 

Taken from www.runnerworld.co.uk

Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some questions that we get asked by people who are taking part in the St David's Day Run. If your question isn't listed then please call the team on 08442 438 438.

1. Will I get a race pack through the post? Yes, you will receive a chip timer and your race number as well as race details in the post at least 1 week before the race itself.

2. Can I switch races that I am entered for? Yes. You are able to switch the race you have entered but you will not be eligible for a refund if the new race is at a lower price. You will however be charged if the new race is a higher price. The cut off date for switching is Sunday 19th February 2017.

3. Is there a minimum age requirement for the races? For the 1K there is no minimum age - it's child friendly. The minimum age of the 5K is 13 years old and the minimum age for the 10K is 16 years old.

4. Are there race t-shirts available? Yes, you can buy a T-shirt from the registration tent on the day. 

OUR PARTNERS

We're proud to work with the following race partners. The run is completely organised and put together by volunteers, so we rely heavily on the support of partner companies for this event.

MPCT

MLT

British Military Fitness

Brecon Carreg

Sequence

Cancer Research Wales

Royal British Legion

Run and Become

PRS

TRADERS & VENDORS

The St David's Day Run was first organised in 2003 by Mr Huw Lewis MBE. The event highlights and celebrates the Welsh National Holiday that is St David's Day and raises vital funds for charities. Over the years the event has gone from strength to strength and raised thousands.

It has become part of the calendar of events for The Motivation and Learning Trust – the young person's charity. As the run takes place on the weekend closest to St David's Day it always attracts some fantastic costumes and takes in some spectacular views of the capital whilst running around Bute Park. The St David's Day Run has always been a family day out offering a 1K, 5K and 10K race.

Contact details

Address

St David's Day Run, MPCT House
Oak Tree Court
Mulberry Drive
Cardiff
CF23 8RS

Email

enquiries@mpct.co.uk

Telephone

0330 111 3939